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European vs. American fighting style.
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TOPIC: European vs. American fighting style.

European vs. American fighting style. 9 years, 7 months ago #25

John Houston in the US you always hear trainers talk about the classic European style, when an American fights over seas. What is the biggest difference between the two, what makes up the European style and what style do you feel is better when matched up with one another? I know skill prevails with both styles but I'm curious to know advantages of one over another. I'm enjoying your very insightful articles John. It's great to have a UK coach like you on this site.
Last Edit: 9 years, 7 months ago by .

Re:European vs. American fighting style. 9 years, 7 months ago #27

  • John
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Hi Stephen,

I think the differences in style between American and European boxers are diminishing, a consequence of communication and ideas being easier to disseminate these days.

I suppose the old definition would have been that European boxers box from a more stand up straight position with a tight closed guard, while American boxers employ more fluid waist movement, often with hands held lower. The other difference from these respective stances is the punches thrown. From the straight up; close-guard more straight punches flow, while the American style can favour hooks.

Historically it has to be said, the American style seems to have prevailed when they are matched up. As you say, skills prevail, but all things being equal the American style seems to have come out on top more often, at least in professional boxing. This is really borne out by the fact that the differences between the styles are diminishing mainly due to the European adoption of American styles. I remember being taught a “British” jab (thrown with the thumb facing up) and an American Jab (palm down) by an old trainer when I started boxing. Now it is only the palm down jab taught as routine. The hook over in the UK is in a transition period, with a lot of amateur trainers still teaching it as thrown with the palm facing down, while most pro’s over here, and an increasing number of amateurs throw it in the American style of thumb facing up.

The growing amalgamation of the styles can be seen in the variety of styles Europe now exports. Our own Ricky Hatton has taken to calling himself The Manchester Mexican, to reflect his aggressive, pressure fighting style. I think the trend will continue as trainers are able to watch different styles and swap ideas more freely, this site being a great example of that!

Re:European vs. American fighting style. 9 years, 7 months ago #31

Thanks for your lengthy insight John. What do you think Hatton must do differently or change to be considered a terror again?

What do you think of David Haye? The Cruserweight division is really loaded with some good fighters don't you think?

Re:European vs. American fighting style. 9 years, 7 months ago #33

  • DOG.1
Hi Stephen,
i.m.h.o i dont think Hatton has to change anything,he was beaten by an amazing boxer in Mayweather.
as for David Haye vs Enzo Maccarinelli,i think Enzo's a bigger puncher than Haye,& i remember Carl thompson stoppin Haye & Enzo's a much heavier puncher than carl.I think it'll be close & all down to who lands the big one first.should be great while it lasts.

Re:European vs. American fighting style. 9 years, 7 months ago #34

  • John
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Hi Stephen,

I’m inclined to agree about Hatton, he was beaten by a great boxer. What he does best is pressure fight with a high work rate; he has never been beaten at Light-Welter, where he has said he is returning. Although he may have lost that aura of invincibility that being undefeated carries, I think it will still take a lot to beat him. I also think his present style plays to his strengths; I can’t see changes at this stage being effective.

David Haye is an exciting prospect at Heavy, and has taken the hard route up at Cruiser and prevailed. I don’t think the early loss to Carl Thompson has any bearing on this fight. Maccarinelli was stopped early on in his career by Lee Swabby, a fighter nowhere near as dangerous as Thompson. Both those losses were more exhaustion knockouts for young hot-shot prospects who were a bit shocked when the opponent didn’t fold like all the others had. They were learning losses, and both men have proved they learnt, and defeated much better boxers and harder punchers since. What really sets this fight alight is the knockout per-centages both have scored since then. It could go either way, but I have to plump for Haye, he has been in with the higher quality opponents. It’s great to see the Cruiser division getting some much deserved attention of late; there is great talent out there at the weight.

Re:European vs. American fighting style. 9 years, 7 months ago #36

  • Rob Pilger
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It helped Haye BIG time that he just beat Mormeck in a tough fight. Mormeck is a dangerous fighter till the end and that is great experience to beat a fighter like that.

I give Haye the big advantage in experience fighting and getting off the canvass to do it in a big fight with Mormeck. Experience is everything. Also withe the great work Haye's strength/conditioning trainer Moritz is doing, look for him to be better. Mo is a great trainer as he is also Juan Carlos Gomez's strength/conditioning trainer.

Bottom line, its going to be a great fight and like John mentioned. The cruserweight division is hot and I think much better than the light heavyweight division, much younger fighters too.

I really like young prospects Matt Godfrey, Aaron Williams and Johnathon Banks .
Last Edit: 9 years, 7 months ago by Rob Pilger.
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