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Question to Joe Rossi- pain
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Question to Joe Rossi- pain 8 years, 1 month ago #189

  • Collin
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coach rossi-I have a question about muscle pain-
Sore muscles happen all the time for fighters, but when is a sore muscle atually injurerd or dammaged? I threw hard hooks at the bag, and one right hook landed with out enough extention in my arm. a whole series of muscles in my back/shoulder and arm are tight almost burning. I know this kind of thing happenes from time to time for alot of fighters.
What has happened to my muscles and what in your opinion is best to treat very sore potntially injured arms and back?
thanks joe

Re:Question to Joe Rossi- pain 8 years, 1 month ago #190

  • Joe Rossi
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Collin,
This is the lifestyle of a gladiator athlete. Severe muscle soreness happens to be an unfortunate bi-product of hard training. It's unfortunate because you feel like shit, but it is sometimes unavoidable. The key word here is \"sometimes\". You may have just pulled some mid-upper back muscles and experiencing extreme soreness but, Before I go on, if you feel shit is just not right with your body and your gut feeling is telling you something is wrong-then go to a doctor and get checked out! This is your call. You know your body better than I do!

Most of the time, when sever muscle soreness and pain occurs from hard training, it can be a addressed in the right manner so no further micro-trauma and muscle breakdown occurs. How? Well I can only tell you what has worked for me and my fighters and athletes that I train.

I am one of the biggest advocates for training your ass off and pushing yourself to a limit you thought you could never go to, but if I or any of my athletes are beat up, tore up, or feel like shit from hard training, I will decrease the intensity, volume, or kick back the training for the day (or what ever amount of time it takes to heal and recover). This is similar to what a power lifter may do to Deload from his/her hard training from weights. I do this so further recovery can take place for better training sessions to occur in the future so my fighters can make further progress for the long run. This has also kept injury down to a minimum.

If you are sore, beat up, and in a state of breakdown, ease up on the scheduled training session for the day. This does not mean you have to blow off training and take the day off, but put your ego in check by making that training day, a day to work around severe muscle soreness and pain.

You can do this by choosing skill work, conditioning drills, or recovery exercises that will enable you to bring blood flow in and around the surrounding joints and body parts, but will not cause further break down. What does this mean? Well, if you are sore as shit in your chest, lats, mid-back, and shoulders, don't be a hero and go pounding this shit out of the heavy bag. An alternative for that day would be for you to keep impact low within the upper body and stick to light shadow boxing or upper body mobility drills that are performed at a lower intensity and slower speed. A day or so like this is also good for other areas of your body to be trained such as footwork, leg conditioning, or jogging. Yes I said jogging as I think jogging is best for days when you are beat up and can't do anything else. These are all ways to still train and get work in, but also kicking back on the shit that is beating you up and breaking you down.

The above has been my main point, but other things that come to mind for you is when the extreme soreness goes away, focus on increasing flexibility through out your entire body. Most fighters I have come into contact with are extremely tight in these upper body muscles known as the Pecs(chest), Lats, and Biceps (muscles on boxers prone to tightness from a fighters posture).

Stay flexible with these muscle groups as well as the rest of your body. Foam Roll with a traditional foam roller, tennis ball, baseball, softball, or even a small medicine ball. This is a form of self massage where you will be able to lean into these tender areas and break up scar tissue, decrease muscle tension, and increase flexibility. Do this before training, after training, or as many times as you want on days you are not training. These are just examples for the upper body, but apply this to every part of your body.

Another thing to keep in mind is developing strength in areas of your body that is weak. I would think of this as corrective exercise or injury prevention training. Are you strength training now? How many days per week if any? What exercises are you performing for how many sets/reps/weight? Hope to here back from you.

Joe Rossi
YESS Training
(How many times did I write the word “Shit” here?)

Re:Question to Joe Rossi- pain 8 years, 1 month ago #191

  • Collin
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OK Joe great stuff here. thats funny man, all the shits!
I aim to be flexible with alot of stretching most days, I strength train roughly one out of five days. I always mix it up with my strength routine. my last workout was five or six days ago. i got my hands on a MMA strength book written by the Gracies, and i did for the first time judo pushups, pike ball press, ball push ups[that's hilarious), aligator crawl, Bridge, dumbell speed twist, med ball sit ups ANYWAY i'm sore as shit still, but i know these smaller stabilizer muscles are not going to snap or get strained. Coach Rob gave me the insight that you use your brain foremost in the sweet science. i figure, train like a scientist.
i blade around my neighborhood for tyson legs, i focus on quality pushups and form when i do those calistheics, basically i want to build quality muscles,understandable right? im sykt to have an un believable workout plan. i am sticking to it, and i swear i feel stronger since i've started.

Re:Question to Joe Rossi- pain 8 years, 1 month ago #197

  • Joe Rossi
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Collin,
The real name for that variation of push-up is called \"Ball Sack Push-up\". For obvious reasons, the name never stuck.

I'm glad you are pumped Collin. All those pushing variations will definitely have a positive carry-over to fight, but you have to balance out the push to pull ratio.
I would really like to see more pulling and extension exercises in there that counter all the push-ups and ab work. Again, push-ups and ab work are good \"go-to\" movements, but add in low, middle, and upper back training to increase strength in your spinal erectors (muscles along the spine from the low back up), lower/middle traps (muscles which bring balance and give strength for shoulder/blade strength) lats (major muscle responsible for pulling and pulling strength), and some other muscles that will get stronger with increased pulling strength. Remember, for a fighter to be punching optimally, you have to be strong through out the entire body. Not just the push movements. Not just the pull movements. Not just strong shoulders. Not just strong this or that. You have to be strong all over and approach your weight training trying to increase strength, power, flexibility, and mobility EVERYWHERE.

Where to start? Pick from some of these movements that have worked for us in no specific order:

-Pull-up/Chin-up variation
-Kneeling/Standing Dumbbell,Cable, or Band \"Scarecrows\"
-Chest supported on a 45 degree bench Dumbbell \"Scarecrow\"
-45 degree low-back raises
-Reverse Hyperextensions performed on a Reverse Hyper machine or performed without.
-Bent-Over Barbell/Dumbbell Rows
-Chest Supported Scaptions
-Any F-ing movement that you have to pull something to you to fire up these muscle groups and force you to pinch your shoulder blades together/down

Joe Rossi
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